Low-Paid Workers in Many Other States – but not Wisconsin – Got a Raise This Month

Wednesday, January 4, 2017 at 11:42 AM by

Low-paid workers across the country got a raise this month, as 19 states increased their minimum wages. A higher minimum wage means that workers will be better able to make ends meet and support their families, but the benefits don’t end there. More income in the pockets of workers translates to additional economic activity, and workers spend their raises at local businesses buying groceries, getting their cars fixed, or paying off medical bills.

The 19 states that increased their minimum wage this month are Massachusetts, Washington, California, New York, Arizona, Maine, Colorado, Alaska, Florida, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, Ohio, South Dakota, Arkansas, Connecticut, Hawaii, Michigan and Vermont.

Unfortunately, Wisconsin workers and communities will not receive any of the benefits of a higher minimum wage. Wisconsin is among the minority of states that have a minimum wage stuck at $7.25 per hour, a level that was last increased in 2009.

Most STates Have Higher Minimum Wage

Because Wisconsin is not among the states that have set a higher minimum wage, a full-time, full-year worker in Wisconsin still earn as little $14,500 per year. Read more

Voters Demonstrate Popularity of Minimum Wage Increases

Tuesday, November 15, 2016 at 10:41 AM by

Trump Owes It to Workers to Raise the Floor for Wages

The broad popular support for increasing the minimum wage was demonstrated quite clearly on November 8 when voters backed increases in all five states where the wage floor was on the ballot. President-elect Trump should back up his promises to help the working class by pushing for a significant boost in the national minimum wage, which has been stuck at $7.25 per hour for almost eight years.

In Arizona, Colorado, and Maine, voters approved increases in their state minimum wages to $12 by 2020. Voters in Washington State went further by approving a measure to raise the minimum wage to $13.50 by 2020, and the electorate of Flagstaff Arizona approved an increase to $15 by 2021. The state-level ballot measures in Arizona and Washington also expand paid sick leave to more workers.

The increases in the pay floor were approved by significant percentages: 60% in Washington, 59% in Arizona, and 55% in both Colorado and Maine. Read more

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Can You Hear Me Now? How about Now? Wisconsin Residents Again Voice Support for Raising Minimum Wage

Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 2:06 PM by

Half of Wisconsin residents support a very large increase in Wisconsin’s minimum wage that would more than double what the lowest-paid workers earn, according to a new Marquette University poll. Yet Wisconsin lawmakers have yet  to show any inclination they consider it a priority to make sure the lowest-paid workers in Wisconsin get a raise.

This isn’t the first time that Wisconsin residents have shown their support for increasing the minimum wage. In 2014, voters in 13 Wisconsin counties and cities had the opportunity to vote on a referendum asking lawmakers to raise the minimum wage – and every one of the referendums passed. Past polls by Marquette University have also shown that large majorities want the minimum wage raised.

What’s different about this poll is that it gauged support for raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour, more than double Wisconsin’s current minimum wage of $7.25. Past Marquette University polls asked about increasing the minimum to $10.10 per hour or did not identify a specific increase in the minimum wage. Read more

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Low-Paid Workers in Several Locations Get a Raise – But Not in Wisconsin

Thursday, July 7, 2016 at 12:50 PM by

Low-paid workers in various locations across the country got a raise this month, as increases in the minimum wage took effect in several states, counties, and cities. However, workers in Wisconsin were not among those benefitting from an increase in the minimum wage.

Locations with increases in the minimum wage include:

  • Oregon, where the minimum wage increased to $9.75 per hour in urban counties and $9.50 in rural counties. The minimum will gradually increase to $12.50 to $14.75 depending on the county in 2022.
  • Maryland, where the lowest-paid hourly workers now earn at least $8.75 an hour. Maryland’s minimum wage is set to slowly increase to $10.10 in 2018.
  • Los Angeles, where low-paid workers will now get at least $10.50 an hour – and six days of paid leave a year. The minimum wage in Los Angeles is set to increase gradually to $15 per hour in 2020.
  • Chicago, where workers will now earn at least $10.50 an hour.
Read more
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Five Delicious Pie Charts for Pi Day

Monday, March 14, 2016 at 2:00 AM by

Happy Pi Day! Today’s date is 3-14, a close approximation of the pi value of 3.141592…

The best way to celebrate Pi Day is – news flash! – to eat some pie.

Pie

Jon and Tamarine celebrate Pi Day. Mmmmm…strawberry rhubarb!

The second best way of observing Pi Day is to enjoy some delicious pie charts. Sure, pie charts don’t go nearly as well with ice cream as the real thing, but they’re still enjoyable.

Here are five pie charts that tell the story of poverty and economic hardship in Wisconsin, and how the share of the pie that goes to the middle class is shrinking.

Pie Chart #1: Highest earners capture nearly all of the income growth in Wisconsin

Nearly all income growth has gone to the top 1%

Wisconsin families and businesses can’t thrive when income growth is nearly non-existent for everyone except for those at the very top. The share of income in Wisconsin going to the top 1% is at its highest level ever, widening the chasm between the very highest earners and everyone else, and posing a hardship for Wisconsin’s families, communities, and businesses. Read more

Categories: Blog, ECONOMIC SECURITY, income inequality, JOBS & THE ECONOMY, minimum wage, poverty | Comments Off on Five Delicious Pie Charts for Pi Day

2016: The Seventh Year of Wisconsin’s Frozen Minimum Wage

Tuesday, December 29, 2015 at 6:07 PM by

As the calendar turns to 2016 this Friday, the minimum wage will increase in 14 states and a number of cities, and two other states have enacted increases that take effect later in the year. Unfortunately, Wisconsin isn’t one of them. In fact, Wisconsin is one of the 21 states where the minimum wage is just $7.25 per hour and has been stuck at that amount since the last increase in the federal minimum, which was almost seven years ago.

Here are some examples of the 16 state minimum wage increases that take effect in 2016. (These figures are for the general minimum wage, which in many states does not apply to tipped employees.)

  • Arkansas The minimum wage will be $8.00 an hour in 2016 and $8.50 in 2017, compared to $7.50 in 2015.
  • California and Massachusetts $10.00 an hour (vs. $9.00 now)
  • Connecticut, Rhode Island and Vermont – $9.60 an hour (from $9.00 or $9.15 now)
  • Maryland – $8.75 an hour (from $8.00 in 2015, and increasing to $10.10 in 2018)
  • Michigan – $8.50 an hour (from $8.15)
  • Minnesota – $9.50 an hour (from $9.00)
  • Nebraska $9.00 an hour (compared to $8.00 in 2015)
Read more
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Minimum Wage Workers in Many Other States get a Raise, but not in Wisconsin

Monday, January 5, 2015 at 9:30 AM by
Low-wage workers in Ohio, Nebraska, and 18 other states got a raise at the beginning of the year when those states increased their minimum wages. Minimum-wage workers in Wisconsin got no such bump in their paychecks.

Election Results Show Broad Support for increasing Minimum Wage, in Wisconsin and Elsewhere

Thursday, November 6, 2014 at 1:18 PM by

Voters in Wisconsin and across the country showed extensive support on Tuesday for increasing the minimum wage, by approving ballot measures calling for raises for the lowest-paid workers.

Across Wisconsin, 67% of voters approved raising the minimum wage to $10.10 from its current level of $7.25. The non-binding referendum was on the ballot in nine counties and four cities where local officials voted to include it.

The measure to increase Wisconsin’s minimum wage passed with flying colors even in solidly red parts of the state. For example, in Wood County, voters favored Governor Walker over Mary Burke by a wide margin, giving Walker 57% of their votes. But the Wood County electorate also showed strong support for increasing the minimum wage, with 56% of voters approving the measure.

The minimum wage proved to be a winning issue in other states as well.  Voters in four states and two cities approved binding measures to increase the minimum wage and give an estimated 609,000 low-wage workers a raise next year. Read more

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Raising the Minimum Wage Would Boost Incomes for Wisconsin Workers earning Poverty-Level Wages

Monday, October 20, 2014 at 10:28 AM by

Poverty-wage work is widespread in Wisconsin, with 1 in 4 workers earning poverty-level wages, according to a new report from the Center on Wisconsin Strategy. Raising the minimum wage would give these workers a raise, provide a shot in the arm to the local economy, and help create a more inclusive version of economic prosperity.

There is a wealth of information about poverty-wage workers in Wisconsin in the COWS report, but one fact in particular stands out: The typical poverty-wage worker in Wisconsin is 30 years old. (The report defines poverty-wage work as work that pays $11.35 an hour or less, the amount needed to keep a family of four out of poverty with full-time, year-round work.)

Opponents of raising the minimum wage sometimes mischaracterize the issue as a disagreement about how much to pay teenage workers. In one of the gubernatorial debates, Governor Walker recalled working for minimum wage at McDonald’s, but said he knew he would be moving on to better-paying jobs. Read more

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Increasing Both the Earned Income Tax Credit and the Minimum Wage Would Strengthen Wisconsin’s Families

Friday, September 12, 2014 at 8:48 AM by

EITC min wageState lawmakers who want to help Wisconsin families recover from the recession should move to boost both the state’s earned income tax credit and its minimum wage. Each policy on its own helps make work pay for families struggling on low wages, but improving them at the same time goes further to putting working families on the path to economic security and opportunity, according to a new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Low wages make it hard for working families to afford basics like decent housing in a safe neighborhood, nutritious food, reliable transportation, quality child care, or educational opportunities that put families on a path to greater economic security.

But, state lawmakers have tools that can help address stagnant low wages. One, increase the state Earned Income Tax Credit. Two, raise the state minimum wage and make future increases automatic to keep up with inflation

These policies both are targeted to assist only those who are working, helping them to better afford basic necessities, including the things that allow them to keep working, like car repairs and child care. Read more

Categories: Blog, ECONOMIC SECURITY, EITC, minimum wage, STATE TAXES | Comments Off on Increasing Both the Earned Income Tax Credit and the Minimum Wage Would Strengthen Wisconsin’s Families