Wisconsin’s Lagging Income Growth Boosts Federal Share of Medicaid Costs

Wednesday, October 4, 2017 at 5:37 PM by

A state’s lagging economic performance can have a silver lining – in the form of increased federal assistance. Thanks to a Medicaid formula that currently provides more generous cost-sharing to states that are below average in per capita income, Wisconsin’s rather anemic personal income growth will save the state millions of dollars during the 2017-19 budget period.

However, that feature of Medicaid funding allocations could be gone in a few years if Congress approves the recent Republican proposals that would block grant or cap each state’s allocation. Read more

Categories: 2017-19 biennial budget, Blog, federal issues, HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES, health care reform, income, Medicaid | Comments Off on Wisconsin’s Lagging Income Growth Boosts Federal Share of Medicaid Costs

New ACA Repeal Plan Expected to Cost Wisconsin $29 Billion by 2036

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 12:50 PM by
The new proposal to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is estimated to reduce federal health care funding for Wisconsin by $29 billion from 2020 through 2036. That’s the conclusion of an analysis released on September 21 by Avalere Health. The Avalere analysis helps illustrate why the new ACA repeal and replace plan, like the ones before it, would result in at least 20 million fewer Americans with health insurance by 2021. And under this plan offered by Senators Graham and Cassidy, the rapid drop in insurance coverage could reach 32 million in 2027, according to a report issued today by the Brookings Institute. The new proposal would make insurance far less affordable for many who now use the subsidized ACA marketplace and would force states to make deep cuts in Medicaid services for children, seniors and people with disabilities.
Categories: BadgerCare Plus, Blog, federal issues, health care reform, Medicaid | Comments Off on New ACA Repeal Plan Expected to Cost Wisconsin $29 Billion by 2036

New Census Data Show Continued Gains from the ACA

Tuesday, September 12, 2017 at 6:28 PM by

Insurance Coverage Also Improves in Wisconsin, but More Slowly than in Medicaid Expansion States

The number of Wisconsinites who do not have health insurance fell sharply during the first three years of implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), according to new survey data released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. Approximately 218,000 fewer Wisconsin residents were uninsured last year than in 2013, a decline of 42 percent.

Wisconsin is still among the top ten states in the percentage of people with insurance, but our state’s rank has been slipping. We went from being tied for 7th best in 2015 to a tie for 10th best last year.  In 2016, Kentucky, West Virginia, Connecticut and Rhode Island all surpassed or tied Wisconsin’s rate of insurance coverage. Read more

Categories: Blog, health care reform, income | Comments Off on New Census Data Show Continued Gains from the ACA

ACA Repeal “Fixes” Continue to Shortchange Wisconsin

Monday, July 24, 2017 at 5:08 PM by

The legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) can’t be fixed, but Senator McConnell and President Trump are still trying to revive it. McConnell plans to have a vote on July 25 on a procedural measure to initiate floor debate on the bill.

The conclusion that the bill isn’t fixable is reinforced by the badly flawed amendments that have been suggested as ways of getting a few more Senate Republicans to vote for the bill. One of the many problems with the following amendments is that each of them would adversely affect Wisconsin: Read more

Categories: Blog, federal issues, HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES, health care reform, Medicaid | Comments Off on ACA Repeal “Fixes” Continue to Shortchange Wisconsin

Repeal without Replacing: A Health Care Disaster

Tuesday, July 18, 2017 at 6:13 PM by

A month or two ago, President Trump described the House plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as being “mean,” and he was right. Yet today he endorsed a far meaner approach – repealing the ACA without a replacement plan – even though he was the one who shot down that idea when Congress was considering it back in January, and despite the fact that a wealth of data demonstrate what a disaster that approach would be.

Senator McConnell is trying to breathe life into the strategy of repealing the ACA without first coming up with a replacement. That became his fallback plan today after it became apparent late yesterday that there aren’t enough votes to even begin the floor debate on the extremely unpopular “repeal and replace” plan, which a small group of Senators spent the last couple of months developing behind closed doors.

President Trump endorsed the new strategy, but some of the other Republican lawmakers who opposed the idea early this year – and whose positions are less fluid than Trump’s – have said they are still unwilling to wipe away the current law without having a replacement plan. Read more

Categories: Blog, federal issues, HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES, health care reform | Comments Off on Repeal without Replacing: A Health Care Disaster

Wisconsin Bill Does Little to Protect People with Preexisting Conditions

Monday, June 26, 2017 at 5:54 PM by

Bill Passed by Assembly Fails to Close a Huge Loophole Proposed by Republicans in Congress

One of the many problems with the bill to repeal and partially replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is that it would seriously erode the current protections for millions of Americans who have preexisting health conditions. That’s a very unpopular part of the American Health Care Act (AHCA), the Republican health care bill, but there’s a lot of confusion about how it undermines coverage for people with chronic health conditions.

The confusion was evident during a late night debate in the Wisconsin legislature last week, when the Assembly passed a bill that would purportedly protect people with preexisting conditions, but which largely misses the mark because it fails to address a huge loophole contained in AHCA. The muddled debate after midnight on June 22nd is a great example of why there needs to be a longer and more open debate about the version of AHCA that was developed behind closed doors in recent weeks. Read more

Categories: Blog, federal issues, HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES, health care reform | Comments Off on Wisconsin Bill Does Little to Protect People with Preexisting Conditions

Congressional Changes to Medicaid Leave Wisconsin Behind

Wednesday, June 14, 2017 at 5:54 PM by

AHCA Would Permanently Lock in Wisconsin’s Lower Federal Funding

Without so much as a single public hearing, Congress is close to approving huge changes to Medicaid that substantially reduce spending and radically change how funding is allocated. One of the ways that those changes will hurt Wisconsin is by permanently penalizing states like ours that currently spend well below the national average for each person in Medicaid.

One aspect of this problem has gotten some press attention this week – the way that the new funding allocation will lock into place lower federal support for the 19 states, including Wisconsin, that did not take federal Medicaid expansion funds. Jason Stein’s June 13 article in the Journal Sentinel does a nice job of covering that issue.

However, an even more basic problem is that the new funding formula would be based on each state’s average spending per Medicaid participant, which will freeze into place the lower federal funding levels in states that have had very narrow benefits and also in states with more generous benefits but more efficient use of their funding. Read more

Categories: Blog, HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES, health care reform, Medicaid | Comments Off on Congressional Changes to Medicaid Leave Wisconsin Behind

Efforts to Repeal and Replace the ACA Boost the Current Law’s Support

Tuesday, June 6, 2017 at 5:23 PM by

Polling Shows Public Opposition to House Bill and to Medicaid Changes

The more that Congress extends the debate about the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the stronger support gets for the existing law. And as people learn more about the American Health Care Act (AHCA), which is the bill the House passed last month that would repeal and replace the ACA, the more they dislike the House plan.

The latest survey results from the Kaiser Health Tracking Poll show that the majority of Americans, 55 percent, are not pleased with AHCA.   The poll also found that:

  • 55% of the public want the Senate to make major changes to the bill or just not pass it all.
  • Only 31% view the AHCA favorably, vs 49% who view the ACA favorably.
Read more
Categories: Blog, FEDERAL BUDGET & TAXES, federal issues, HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES, health care reform, Medicaid | Comments Off on Efforts to Repeal and Replace the ACA Boost the Current Law’s Support

Trump Budget Demonstrates the Perils of Changing Medicaid

Wednesday, May 24, 2017 at 5:39 PM by

Medicaid Cut Projected to Be 45% in 2026, and More in Future Years

In order to pay for huge tax cuts for corporations and wealthy Americans, the President is proposing massive Medicaid cuts – far beyond the amounts contained in the House plan to “repeal and replace” the Affordable Care Act.

Whereas the House-passed bill is now projected to cut Medicaid by $834 billion over the next 10 years, the Trump budget unveiled this week would cut Medicaid by about $1.3 trillion, according to an analysis by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP).  The following bar graph illustrates how those cuts would get deeper over time. Read more

Negative Effects of the House Health Care Bill Keep Expanding

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 3:17 PM by

[UPDATE — This post was revised on May 3 to reflect the new position of Congressman Fred Upton, who has authored an amendment that might secure enough votes for House passage of the bill on May 4.]

Passage of the House plan to repeal and partially replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) would make sweeping changes that negatively affect most Americans. Yet some opponents of the ACA have made the mistaken or disingenuous argument that few people would be affected.

Governor Walker, for example, told reporters on March 8 of this year that repealing and replacing the ACA with Speaker Ryan’s plan would only affect a small percentage of Wisconsinites:

“Most people aren’t going to be affected by this no matter what happens because if you get your health insurance from your employer, which is almost everybody here and almost everybody in this state, nothing changes.”

That assessment was flawed at the time, and since early March it has steadily become more apparent that most Wisconsinites could be adversely affected. Read more

Categories: Blog, federal issues, health care reform, Medicaid | Comments Off on Negative Effects of the House Health Care Bill Keep Expanding