Should Counties Put a BadgerCare Expansion Question on the Fall Ballot?

Friday, July 11, 2014 at 11:59 AM by

At least 13 Wisconsin counties may include an advisory referendum on the November ballot asking voters whether Wisconsin should expand BadgerCare and take the federal funding that would cover the full cost of newly eligible childless adults.  The proposed ballot measure, which has already been approved in 4 counties and enjoys broad support, has generated debate about whether the Medicaid expansion topic is an appropriate matter for an advisory referendum.

There are many strong arguments in favor of taking the federal funding (see WCCF’s “Top Ten” list); however, some people who argue against including the BadgerCare question on the November ballot contend that it’s not a concern of county government.  But even if we assume for the moment that an interest in county residents’ access to affordable health care isn’t reason enough for counties to allow voters to weigh in on the issue, counties also have their own reasons to be very interested in whether the state expands BadgerCare and accepts the federal funds:

  • One very important consideration for counties is they bear the financial responsibility (rather than the state) for some community-based Medicaid services.
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Wisconsin Gets Bad News Today on Both Taxes and Spending

Friday, June 27, 2014 at 5:03 PM by

Revenue Collections Continue to Fall, While Medicaid Deficit Takes Large Jump

The state’s fiscal situation has gradually deteriorated in 2014, and new tax collection figures released late Friday afternoon show a continuation of that trend. That fiscal problem is exacerbated by a couple of areas where spending is growing, including a substantial increase announced today in the estimated Medicaid deficit.

Starting on the revenue side of the state’s budget ledger, here are some of the key figures gleaned from the Department of Revenue’s press release:

  • General Fund tax collections fell $26 million in May, compared to May 2013, which is a drop of 2.5% (measured on an adjusted basis).
  • Over the first 11 months of the current fiscal year, state tax revenue is down by almost $49 million or 0.4%.
  • Although sales tax revenue is up by $186 million or 5.2% over the last 11 months, individual income tax collections are down by almost $290 million – a drop of 4.6%.
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Sizing up Wisconsin’s Budget Challenges

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 at 3:38 PM by

Several significant pieces of Wisconsin budget data were released late last week:

  • Our state is facing a structural deficit of $642 million in the next biennium, which means that $642 million of growth in General Purpose Revenue (GPR) will be needed even if there is no net increase in spending levels in the 2015-17 budget.
  • State tax collections were 21% lower in April than in the same month of the previous fiscal year. (See our May 23 blog post.)
  • Total Wisconsin tax collections over the first 10 months of the current fiscal year are $21 million less than in the comparable portion of 2012-13.

None of these news items is cause for alarm right now, but the convergence of these facts means the state’s fiscal situation merits watching and might prove to be weaker than some state lawmakers have assumed.

Before taking a closer look at some of the cautionary considerations, let’s start by reviewing several positive perspectives on the state’s budget situation:

  • The estimated structural deficit for 2015-17 is substantially smaller than the budget challenges the state faced in most of the other budgets since the late 1990s.
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State Tax Collections Drop 21% in April

Friday, May 23, 2014 at 5:12 PM by

Figures released Friday by the Department of Revenue indicate that state tax collections were 21% lower in April than in the same month of 2013 – primarily because of a $332 million drop in individual income tax revenue.  Perhaps more importantly, tax collections have been falling for the past several months – to the point that total tax revenue over the first 10 months of the current fiscal year is now a little bit (0.2%) below the total at this point of the previous fiscal year.

Of course, part of the sharp decline in April can be attributed to income tax cuts that took effect at the beginning of tax year 2014, and part is the result of reductions in income tax withholding that took effect on April 1.  Those variables and others make it difficult to do the number crunching to assess whether the latest drop in tax collections is cause for alarm – especially on a gorgeous Friday afternoon when I’m anxious to get out of the office and start the holiday weekend.  Read more

Important Choices Tuesday on Funding for Welfare to Work and Child Care Programs

Monday, May 5, 2014 at 8:04 PM by

New Federal Money Provides Chance to Close Large Hole in W-2 and Improve Child Care 

Wisconsin got some good news from Washington over the last couple of months, in the form of supplemental federal funding for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and additional child care and development funds (CCDF).  The plans for using part of that additional funding – $19.8 million from TANF and $3.8 million from CCDF – will be reviewed by the Joint Finance Committee (JFC) on May 6th.  (The LFB paper can be found here.)

I’ve written numerous times over the past year or so about the fact that the biennial budget bill made very unrealistic assumptions about declining participation in the state’s welfare to work program, known as Wisconsin Works or W-2.  The budget bill cut the W-2 appropriation and siphoned off TANF block grant funding by using it to supplant state funds for the Earned Income Tax Credit.  Read more

Can Wisconsin Grow Its Way out of a Deficit in the Next Budget?

Monday, March 3, 2014 at 8:22 PM by

Perhaps, but Further Budget Cuts Are Likely to be Part of the Solution

It appears that the Wisconsin Legislature is on the verge of passing a slightly amended version of the Special Session tax cut bill, which uses the projected state surplus in a way that leaves the state with a “structural deficit” of about $700 million at the beginning of the next session.  (See note below.)  The good news is that the way the Fiscal Bureau calculates structural deficits doesn’t make any estimate of revenue growth in the next biennium. The bad news is that it also doesn’t account for any spending growth, and it depends on fairly strong revenue growth over the next 15 months, which is by no means guaranteed.  (Technical correction: The structural deficit was reduced to $658 million by a Finance Committee amendment that requires $38 million to be cut/lapsed at the outset of the next biennium.) 

Proponents of the proposed tax cuts contend that tax growth in the next biennium can be expected to surpass the amount needed to close the structural deficit.  Read more

Assembly Rejects Democrats’ Alternative Plan for the Projected Surplus

Tuesday, February 11, 2014 at 9:02 PM by

Rejected Plan Included Larger Tax Cuts for Most People and Smaller Structural Deficit 

The Assembly approved the Governor’s proposals for the projected state surplus today, without any substantial changes, and rejected an alternative plan offered by Democrats.  That plan would have reduced the structural deficit, while also providing larger tax cuts to most Wisconsinites, and more funding for technical school training and K-12 eduction.

The plan offered by Assembly Democrats would have replaced the property tax cuts proposed by the governor with a $500 million increase in a current property tax relief program known as the First Dollar Credit.  That credit provides the same amount of property tax relief to the owner of a small home as the owner of a very expensive home or commercial property in the same school district. 

The major elements of the Democrats’ proposals are the following:

  • Decreasing property taxes by an average of $231 in 2014(15), or $100 more than the Governor’s plan.
  • Read more

Low-income Families Contributed to the Budget Surplus

Sunday, February 9, 2014 at 8:24 PM by

New Analysis Examines Why the Surplus Should be Used to Help Low-income Wisconsinites

In his recent “state of the state” address, Governor Walker said that his plan for using the state surplus aims to “ensure we don’t leave anyone behind in our economic progress.”  I applaud the Governor for expressing that objective, but a careful analysis of his plan shows that state lawmakers should amend the special session tax bill if they truly want to accomplish the goal of not leaving behind the Wisconsinites who have been struggling the most in recent years. 

After analyzing where the surplus comes from and who gets the benefits, the Wisconsin Budget Project prepared a short paper that explains why some of the surplus should be used to make at least some modest improvements to the state Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Homestead Credit.  You can find that short document here:  “Top 10 Reasons to Increase Tax Credits for Low-income Households.”

Our analysis notes that the bottom 40% of taxpayers will get just 15% of the benefit of the Governor’s plan.  Read more

Taking Stock of the Earned Income Tax Credit on EITC Awareness Day

Friday, January 31, 2014 at 5:59 PM by

Despite Using Far More TANF Funds for the WI EITC, Total Spending Declines

Today is EITC Awareness Day, when the IRS works with community organizations, elected officials, state and local governments, schools, employers, and other interested parties to spotlight the Earned Income Tax Credit, and to encourage more eligible families and individuals to apply for the credit. The IRS estimates that one fifth of eligible taxpayers fail to claim and get this important credit. 

In recognition or EITC Awareness day, let’s take a look at the Wisconsin EITC, including some recently released data showing the declining value of that credit over the past years, and the role of that decline in adding to the state surplus.   It’s also a good time to consider the effectiveness of the EITC as a tool for helping make work pay for low-income families.    

As the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities pointed out in a January 31 paper, the EITC helps working families make ends meet and encourages them to keep working and to work more hours.  Read more

Categories: 2013-15 biennial budget, Blog, EITC, STATE TAXES, TANF | Comments Off