This Tax Day, Remember that Taxes Make Investments in a Strong Economy Possible

Wednesday, April 15, 2015 at 1:56 AM by

Today is April 15th, the deadline for most people to file their income tax forms without penalty. We hear a lot of negative messages about taxes on this day. But this Tax Day, let’s remember that creating jobs and building broad-based prosperity requires investing in what works – and we can’t do that without taxes. 

To build a strong Wisconsin economy, we need to invest in assets that help businesses thrive and help hard-working people climb into the middle class. That means Wisconsin needs to continue our tradition of supporting high-quality schools and preschools, an affordable university system, a healthy workforce, and a clean environment.

Taxes make these investments possible.

When state lawmakers cut income taxes for the wealthy or for corporations, we undermine our ability to support important services that Wisconsin businesses and residents rely on every day.  We should focus on making sure we have the resources we need to invest in the building blocks of job creation and economic growth. Read more

Better Choices: A Blueprint for Avoiding Harmful Budget Cuts

Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at 2:07 PM by

Legislators Can Avoid Deep Cuts without Raising Taxes

Wisconsin needs a budget that invests in the building blocks of a strong economy.  Healthy families, safe and stable communities, and a well-educated workforce are assets critical to helping Wisconsin remain an attractive place to live, raise families, and do business. By strengthening these resources, the state budget can lay the groundwork for broad-based prosperity and an economy that works for everyone.

Unfortunately, the budget proposed by the Governor makes deep and unnecessary cuts to investments vital to Wisconsin’s long-term economic success. For example, the proposed budget would reduce resources for public education – a cut that would come on top of dramatic reductions in resources that have already occurred. The budget would also make deep cuts in state support for the University of Wisconsin System, giving a tremendous blow to one of the engines of Wisconsin’s long-term prosperity. The proposed budget would also make it harder for people with disabilities to get the help they need to contribute to their communities. Read more

Wisconsin’s Tax System Requires the Least from Those who Have the Most

Monday, April 13, 2015 at 6:11 AM by

To build a strong economy and broad-based prosperity in Wisconsin, we need to make sure everyone has the chance to thrive economically. But Wisconsin’s tax system is stacked against people with low and moderate incomes, making it harder for those taxpayers to make ends meet or get ahead. Meanwhile, the very richest Wisconsin residents pay a much smaller share of their income in state and local taxes.

Wisconsin’s middle class, once one of the strongest in the country, is shrinking faster than in any other state. That trend should set off alarm bells for policymakers, who should be using the tax system and other tools to help Wisconsin’s middle class grow and prosper. Instead, lawmakers have created a tax system in which middle-income taxpayers pay a much higher share of their income in state and local taxes than do the very richest taxpayers.

Wisconsin taxpayers in the top 1% by income, who earn at least $399,000 a year, pay $6.20 in state and local taxes out of every $100 they earn, on average. Read more

Runaway Tax Cut: Price Tag for Tax Credit far Higher than Expected

Tuesday, March 24, 2015 at 2:21 PM by

A tax cut that nearly wipes out income taxes for manufacturers is now expected to cost the state more than twice the original estimate, and has reduced resources for Wisconsin’s public schools and university system.

The Manufacturing and Agriculture Tax Credit gradually reduces income tax rates for businesses engaged in manufacturing or agriculture. When the credit is fully phased in in fiscal year 2017, many businesses engaged in those activities will not have to pay any state incomes taxes at all, and others will have their income taxes reduced by at least 95%.

The projected cost of virtually eliminating income taxes for manufacturers and agricultural producers has ballooned since lawmakers passed the measure in 2011. This year, the tax cut is slated to reduce taxes for businesses by $152 million, more than twice as much as was originally estimated. Once the tax cut is completely phased in, the credit will cut taxes for business by a whopping $285 million per year, a price tag $156 million higher than originally expected. Read more

Categories: Blog, corporate tax, STATE TAXES, taxes | Comments Off

When is Money for Schools not Money for Schools? When It’s for Tax Cuts Instead

Thursday, February 26, 2015 at 2:53 PM by

Why haven’t the property tax cuts included in Governor Walker’s budget proposal gotten much attention from the media or community advocates? One reason might be because of the way he has structured the tax cuts, which are mingled with state support for public schools. A new budget summary from the Wisconsin Budget Project includes information about the tax cuts and other parts of the Governor’s budget that affect taxes and state revenue.

Unlike income taxes or sales taxes, property taxes are levied by local governments, including counties, cities, school districts, and technical college districts. So when state lawmakers want to cut property taxes, they can’t do it directly. Instead, they increase the amount of aid to local governments while simultaneously prohibiting those governments from increasing their budgets. The result is that local governments must then cut property taxes.

In the state budget, this method of cutting property taxes shows up as an increase in state spending in aid for local governments. Read more

Fiscal Bureau Projects $283 Million Deficit at the End of this Fiscal Year

Friday, January 23, 2015 at 5:32 PM by

The Very Bad Fiscal News for this Year Offsets Improved Revenue Estimates for the Next Biennium

New budget figures from the Legislative Fiscal Bureau (LFB) indicate that the state is on track to have a $283 million deficit at the end of the fiscal year. That hole is $153 million deeper than what the Department of Administration (DOA) had indicated in November.

Of course, the Fiscal Bureau isn’t predicting that the state will actually finish the fiscal year with a substantial deficit; they are sizing up the amount of red ink that the Walker administration and state legislators have to eliminate in order to meet the constitutional requirement to have a balanced budget. 

On many occasions in 2014, we expressed concerns that state lawmakers were going to have to make painful budget cuts before the end of fiscal year 2014-15 because the tax cuts enacted early last year were based on overly optimistic revenue estimates and because the state was planning to draw down almost all of the anticipated balance. Read more

New Tax Collection Figures Are Mixed News for State Budget

Tuesday, January 20, 2015 at 7:14 PM by

The Department of Revenue (DOR) issued its report on December tax collections today, and at first blush the numbers look bad; however, I think they may actually suggest a modest upturn – relative to the November estimate for the current fiscal year (FY).  Whether that assessment is accurate will become apparent later this week when officials release updated state revenue estimates for FY 2014-15 and for the next biennium, which begins on July 1.

What the short new report reveals on its face is that tax collections were down by 2.6% in December, compared to the same month in 2013, and tax collections for the first half of the current fiscal year were down by 2.7% compared to the last six months of 2013.  Individual income tax collections for the last half of 2014 were down by 6.4% or $232 million, and corporate income tax revenue was down 8.0% or $38 million.  Read more

Wisconsin Near Average in Per Capita Revenue and Spending

Monday, December 22, 2014 at 9:02 PM by

New figures released last week by the Census Bureau show that total state and local spending and revenue in Wisconsin is not much different in Wisconsin than the per capita figures for the nation as a whole.  For example, our analysis of the new data – which is for state and local revenue and spending in 2012 – found the following:

  • Wisconsin ranks 25th in total revenue (including federal aid) per capita, and was 1.5% below the national average on that measure.
  • Looking at all state and local revenue per capita, but excluding federal financing, Wisconsin ranked 19th and was 1.1% above average.
  • We ranked 24th in total spending per capita, 2.9% below average, and 21st (just 0.2% above average) in a slightly narrower spending measure – direct general spending – which I think is better for comparative purposes because it excludes things like state-owned enterprises.

Wisconsin’s figures are higher compared to the national averages when they are measured relative to income, because personal income in Wisconsin is well below the average nationally. Read more

Categories: Blog, spending, STATE TAXES, taxes | Comments Off

Wisconsin Spending Needs Far Exceed the New Revenue Projections

Thursday, November 20, 2014 at 8:19 PM by

State Faces Gap of More than $2.4 Billion between Now and June 2017 

State officials confirmed today what we have feared for many months – that Wisconsin’s spending needs in the next biennium far exceed the projected revenue, and the state must also close a very substantial budget hole in the current fiscal year.  As a result, lawmakers are likely to make cuts that have harmful consequences for Wisconsin children and families and for the investments needed to keep Wisconsin economically competitive. 

Despite the assurances of Walker administration officials over the last couple of months that the state is in strong fiscal shape, the figures contained in a report released by the Department of Administration (DOA) today confirm that balancing the state budget in 2015-17 will require very deep spending cuts or significant tax increases. Specifically, the DOA document reveals the following:

  • Tax revenue for the current fiscal year is now expected to be $82 million below the amount estimated in May (on top of a $281 million tax shortfall in the first half of the biennium), and net appropriations are estimated to be $43 million less.
  • Read more

New DOR Report Foreshadows Budget Challenges

Tuesday, November 18, 2014 at 9:13 PM by

An economic forecast issued Monday by the Department of Revenue (DOR) provides more evidence that Wisconsin will face substantial budget challenges in the current fiscal year and the next biennium.  According to that document, which is the fall 2014 Wisconsin Economic Outlook, the nation’s economic growth will fall well short of what DOR assumed in its last report, which was issued in January.  (These used to be known as the quarterly economic reports, but for some reason are now issued irregularly and just once or twice a year.)

The January economic report was issued in conjunction with increased state revenue projections, which helped persuade state lawmakers to enact substantial tax cuts. But over the last 10 months the estimates of the national* economy, i.e. the “gross domestic product” (GDP), have changed as follows:

  • The anticipated GDP in 2014 is now $152 billion less (-0.9%) than assumed in January. 
  • The estimate for 2015 is $210 billion lower than previously anticipated (-1.1%).
  • Read more