Increasing Both the Earned Income Tax Credit and the Minimum Wage Would Strengthen Wisconsin’s Families

Friday, September 12, 2014 at 8:48 AM by

EITC min wageState lawmakers who want to help Wisconsin families recover from the recession should move to boost both the state’s earned income tax credit and its minimum wage. Each policy on its own helps make work pay for families struggling on low wages, but improving them at the same time goes further to putting working families on the path to economic security and opportunity, according to a new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Low wages make it hard for working families to afford basics like decent housing in a safe neighborhood, nutritious food, reliable transportation, quality child care, or educational opportunities that put families on a path to greater economic security.

But, state lawmakers have tools that can help address stagnant low wages. One, increase the state Earned Income Tax Credit. Two, raise the state minimum wage and make future increases automatic to keep up with inflation

These policies both are targeted to assist only those who are working, helping them to better afford basic necessities, including the things that allow them to keep working, like car repairs and child care.

Improving both Wisconsin’s EITC and minimum wage will boost the income of low-paid workers and help keep many Wisconsin workers and their families out of poverty. Doing so would reduce the widening gap between the rich and those working in low-wage jobs, which holds our economy back.

Together the EITC and minimum wage do a better job of getting low-income children on a better path. The increase in family income can mean that kids go further in school and have higher future earnings in adulthood.

Both policies mean that low-paid working households can spend a bit more at local businesses – paying for things like gas, groceries, and child care – which is good for the economy.

Boosting the EITC and the minimum wage could help large numbers of workers. In Wisconsin, an increase in the state EITC could help keep taxes low for the more than 250,000 working parents who received the credit. Increasing the minimum wage to $10.10 would give a raise to more than half a million Wisconsin workers, and improve the family incomes of 234,000 children in the state.

Unfortunately, Wisconsin lawmakers give little sign of using either of these policy tools in the near future to improve the earning power of families with low incomes. Raising the minimum wage is not an issue that breaks neatly along party lines; some prominent Republicans, including 2012 Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, have voiced support for increasing the wage floor.  But in Wisconsin, Governor Walker called a proposal to raise the state’s minimum wage a “misguided political stunt,” and the legislature hasn’t taken up the issue. Far from improving the state’s EITC, Wisconsin lawmakers made deep cuts to that credit in 2011, increasing the amount of taxes paid by working families with children by $114 million over the last four years.

Together, a bigger EITC and a higher minimum wage can help struggling Wisconsin families make ends meet, boost the state’s economy, and improve children’s chances in life. Wisconsin lawmakers should use these tools to help working families and individuals achieve economic security.

Tamarine Cornelius

Categories: Blog, ECONOMIC SECURITY, EITC, minimum wage, STATE TAXES | Comments Off on Increasing Both the Earned Income Tax Credit and the Minimum Wage Would Strengthen Wisconsin’s Families

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